Playing the Black Card

4,963,329 Views
May 21, 2018

In America, there's a card more valuable than any card from Visa or American Express. What is it? How can you get one? Candace Owens, Communications Director for Turning Point USA, answers these questions.

Self-serving activists who use the “black card” to empower themselves and excuse bad behavior are hurting the black community. 

  • Many self-styled “civil rights activists” remain silent about major problems plaguing black communities, like inner-city violence, because it doesn’t feed the racism narrative.View Source
  • Protesters in Ferguson destroyed a black neighborhood in response to the outcome of the grand jury verdict on the Michael Brown case.View Source
  • Leftwing Democrats court black votes to get elected but often don’t act on black interests once in office.View Source
  • WATCH: Candace Owens on how “race has become a business.”View Source
  • Related Reading: “Black Rednecks and White Liberals” – Thomas SowellView Source

Democrats paint Republicans as racist so minorities will vote Democrat whether or not their policies actually benefit minorities.

  • Democrats regularly attempt to convince minorities that Republicans are racist in order to make sure they continue to vote Democrat, whether or not the party’s policies actually benefit minorities.View Source
  • The American Left seeks to control black opinion and keep black voters from asking what their political leaders have done for them lately.View Source
  • Some of the worst cities for black violence, education, and poverty are liberal Democrat-run cities like Baltimore, Memphis, and Detroit.View Source
  • WATCH: Candace Owens on how the Left attempts to manipulate the black community.View Source

Among black families in which both spouses work full-time, the poverty rate is under 5%—yet welfare programs discourage marriage.

  • Among black families in which both the husband and wife work full time, the poverty rate is under 5 percent. Yet welfare programs incentivize single-parenthood. “The undeniable truth is that neither slavery nor Jim Crow nor the harshest racism has decimated the black family the way the welfare state has,” writes economist Walter E. Williams.View Source
  • Welfare programs "incentivized mothers not to marry fathers,” says political commentator Candace Owens. “That's why single motherhood is up. The government would give you more if you didn't marry him."View Source
  • WATCH: “Black Fathers Matter” – Larry ElderView Source

When black people don’t agree with liberal Democrat positions, liberals often call into question the validity of their blackness.

  • The Left often labels black people as “Uncle Toms” if they voice conservative viewpoints. (Read Michelle Malkin’s list of some of the prominent conservative minorities whose racial credentials have been questioned here.)View Source
  • As a result of various social and political pressures, remaining a Democrat has become a cultural aspect of being black in America, and it can be difficult for blacks to publicly admit being conservative.View Source
  • The reality is, Democrats would have an extremely hard time getting elected without the black vote, thus they seek to control black public opinion in order to control the black vote.View Source
  • Related reading: “Black Rednecks and White Liberals” – Thomas SowellView Source

Leftwing activists only hurt the black community by ignoring important issues facing them, like inner-city violence and single-parenthood.

  • Many leftwing activists remain silent about major problems plaguing black communities, like inner-city violence, because it doesn’t feed the racism narrative.View Source
  • Approximately 93 percent of black homicide victims are killed by other black people, often in gang-related violence.View Source
  • Among black families in which both the husband and wife work full time, the poverty rate is under 5 percent. Yet welfare programs incentivize single-parenthood.View Source
  • Some of the worst cities for black violence, education, and poverty are liberal Democrat-run cities like Baltimore, Memphis, and Detroit.View Source

The welfare state undermines families by incentivizing single-parenthood. It has particularly hurt black communities. 

  • Among black families in which both the husband and wife work full time, the poverty rate is under 5 percent. Yet welfare programs incentivize single-parenthood. “The undeniable truth is that neither slavery nor Jim Crow nor the harshest racism has decimated the black family the way the welfare state has,” writes economist Walter E. Williams.View Source
  • Related reading: “The Red Pill” – John StosselView Source
  • WATCH: “There Is Only One Way Out of Poverty” – Arthur BrooksView Source

You’ve heard about the black card, right?

No—not the one from Visa or American Express. This one is much more valuable. There are entire organizations that have been built upon it. And individuals that have used it to acquire both wealth and influence.

If this sounds like something you might wish to own, you should know that there is only one way you can get your hands on it: you have to be born with black skin.

That’s the only requirement. Really.

You can be poor, middle class, or rich—it doesn't matter. The black card will still confer upon you an entire history of oppression, even if you’ve never been oppressed.

Flash the black card, and most white people will cower.

Play the black card expertly, and you can win awards, make millions—all the while claiming that the people who got you there somehow hate you.

With a black card, you can sell books full of indecipherable prose. Because with a card that powerful, who cares if your words make any sense?

You can call yourself a “civil rights leader” and shake down multinational corporations, or you can torch your own neighborhood because you didn’t like the outcome of a grand jury verdict.

Ironically, the people you might think have the most legitimate claim to the black card refuse to use it.

Take my grandfather, for instance:

He raised me from the time I was 9 years old. Born in 1941 in rural North Carolina, he started working at age five, laying out tobacco to dry on a sharecropping farm. Jim Crow, separate drinking fountains, and the KKK were ever-present realities.

He was 17 when he married my grandmother. He made a living cleaning homes and office buildings until he saved up enough money to open his own cleaning business.

The thing is, he never played any card. Nor did my grandmother. If they had problems, they didn’t blame anybody. They just fixed them.

And they raised me to do the same.

Chores were a requirement in their household. So was reading the Bible every morning before school.

I didn’t like the Bible readings, and I hated the chores. But I realize now that these small acts of discipline, although sometimes stifling, had a strong, positive impact on my character.

I was a first-generation college student. This was supposed to be the ticket to prosperity. But it wasn’t. I left college with a mountain of debt and no practical skills. I had just $80 dollars in my bank account and very few prospects. I could have given up. I could have dug deep into my history and declared myself a natural product of ancestral oppression. I could have played the black card and absolved myself of all responsibility for my own stupid decisions.

Except, I didn’t. Because it would have destroyed my grandfather’s legacy.

I am proud that he had the fortitude to turn nothing into something; and I have no intention of reversing that something back into a nothing.

My attitude comes with a price, however. Because if you are born black and you don’t accept your natural status as a victim, then the validity of your blackness is immediately called into question.

Well, so be it.

If believing in myself, if accepting the responsibility for my failures somehow disqualifies me from owning an imaginary card, then let me be the first to declare that I don’t want one.

I also don’t want Cornel West, Al Sharpton or insert-anyone-else who uses their skin color to game the system as a role model.

I already have my grandfather.

If there is one thing that my family history has taught me, it’s that I do not need a black card—or an imaginary anything—to make something of myself.

For the record, my grandfather, now retired, lives in a home that he and my grandmother built on a plot of land they purchased in North Carolina—the very same sharecropping farm that he worked on as a small child.

His story is unique. His story is beautiful.

Because it’s American.

And that’s the only card I’ve ever been interested in playing.

I’m Candace Owens for Prager University.

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