PragerUSearch
My PragerUDonate

American Military

Playlist: American Military (1 of 13)

Why Did America Fight the Korean War?

Now Playing

Why Did America Fight the Korean War?

Victor Davis Hanson

What was the Korean War? And why was America involved in such a faraway conflict? Was the United States' sacrifice--35,000 killed, over 100,000 wounded--worth it? Historian Victor Davis Hanson, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, shares the fascinating story of the transformative war that many have forgotten.

WWI: The War That Changed Everything

Andrew Roberts

Think of all the horrors of the 20th Century: The Holocaust. The Bolshevik Revolution. The Cold War. Were it not for the assassination of one Austro-Hungarian archduke in 1914, none of those events would have ever happened. Historian and author Andrew Roberts explains.

Why Did America Fight the Vietnam War?

Victor Davis Hanson

Why did America fight the Vietnam War? The military suffered over 58,000 casualties, and America withdrew in defeat. What for? Historian Victor Davis Hanson explains.

What Was the Cold War?

Andrew Roberts

The decades-long “Cold War” (1947-1989) between the United States and the Soviet Union was so named because the two global powers never came to direct blows. Yet, the war was not without its victims. In fact, millions of Cubans, Koreans and Vietnamese suffered under Communist tyranny. In this video, renowned British historian Andrew Roberts explains why “The Cold War” could just as easily be called “The Third World War.”

Why America's Military Must Be Strong

Andrew Roberts

Over the past century there have been periods when the American military has been dominant and periods when it has not. Renowned British historian Andrew Roberts examines the consequences of a weak America versus a strong America and what each means to the peace and prosperity of the world.

D-Day

Peter Caddick-Adams

On June 6, 1944, Allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy in northern France. Their goal: to liberate Western Europe from Nazi tyranny. From a distance, it might seem that victory was pre-ordained, but no one felt that way at the time. British military historian Peter Caddick-Adams tells the incredible story of what happened on that monumental day.

Why America Invaded Iraq

Andrew Roberts

Why did America invade Iraq in 2003? Was it for oil? Or was it because Saddam Hussein was a mass-murdering dictator who harbored terrorists and threatened the region with Weapons of Mass Destruction? If it was the former, wouldn't it have been a lot easier to just buy Iraq's oil on the open market? And if it was the latter, why did Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden and John Kerry support President Bush? Noted British historian, Andrew Roberts, has the answers.

The Truth about the Vietnam War

Bruce Herschensohn

Did the United States win or lose the Vietnam War? We are taught that it was a resounding loss for America, one that proves that intervening in the affairs of other nations is usually misguided. The truth is that our military won the war, but our politicians lost it. The Communists in North Vietnam actually signed a peace treaty, effectively surrendering. But the U.S. Congress didn't hold up its end of the bargain. In just five minutes, learn the truth about who really lost the Vietnam War.

How Iraq Was Won and Lost

Pete Hegseth

What if people have the war in Iraq backwards? What if George W. Bush and the U.S. military won it, and Barack Obama and the Democrats gave it away? Well, we don't have to wonder what if, because Pete Hegseth, who served in Iraq, explains what happened.

Should America be the World's Policeman?

Bret Stephens

Should America be the world's policeman? Does the world even need a policeman? Or would humanity be better off if America weren't the dominant military superpower? Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and foreign affairs expert Bret Stephens weighs in.

Was it Wrong to Drop the Atom Bomb on Japan?

Father Wilson Miscamble

In recent years, many academics and others have condemned President Truman's decision to use the atomic bomb on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as unnecessary and immoral. Yet this interpretation relies on a poor understanding of history that both lacks perspective and ignores context. Dropping the bomb shortened the war and saved countless lives -- both American and Japanese. In five minutes, Professor of History at Notre Dame, Father Wilson Miscamble, explains.

3,000,163,184
video views & counting
Help us reach our next billion
Donate